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, of course, had some great contemporary. he worked with people like hubert humphrey, lyndon johnson, scoop jackson. it was a really interesting time with some great senators. >> what was his relationship with lyndon johnson when they're both in the senate? >> i spent some time at the kennedy library, and his file is thick with letters to lyndon johnson asking for better committee assignments. johnson was the senate democratic leader. kennedy was the more junior senator so he was sending johnson a lot of letters asking for different committee assignments. johnson seem to put them away, and ted sorenson had a wonderful know. kennedy appointed john to do some third or fourth tier dredging commission or something. sorts and send them and said we are making great progress. senator johnson is named you the chairman of the boston harbor dredging commission. it was a competitive relationship, but in the end i think johnson came to respect kennedy as a tough, former politician. didn't think he was a real heavy hitter on policy but he thought he was a really compelling political figure. >> did presi
,tner to her lyndon johnson. you the storytell of claudia taylor johnson known ourady bird, the wife of 36th president. here to tell her story are cokie roberts, political commentary for abc news and npr, also the books, "founding mothers" and "ladies of liberty." curly is an expert of working on a biography lady bird johnson. i want to start with the beginning, where we were 50 week, this is an administration birthed in national tragedy. the immediate challenges for the brand new the firstle in terrible days after the assassination of kennedy. >> it was enormous. nobody knew if it was a widespread plot so the country was in terror for a period of had to be both taking over and making sure that peaceful transition of power without seeming to take the image ofof kennedys out the of the way so they had to be very, very careful in how they handled it and lyndon johnson birdery lucky he had lady to help him with that because she had a good ear for knowing exactly what to say and when to it. >> in particular, what did she do during those first weeks? she said she felt she was on stage for a part
he came into the senate that lyndon johnson to had, at least the power to make these appointments, but among the foreign relations committee. that gave me a good feeling. he was on the foreign relations committee, but he was not there really to spend time running out legislation, having tens of hearings, i presume, for almost every ambassador from the united states to every country, all of the appointments of the state department or so forth. as we celebrated foreign relations committees, a couple of years ago, the historical society gave me an opportunity to point out that the foreign relations committee hold more hearings or at least in those days, then any of the committee. at the time to process all the personnel. likewise, all of the various things that are occurring in the world. president kennedy contributed to visit to these, but this was not a preoccupation. we will was on his mind was the presidency and how he was going to prepare, really, to be a great president, how he was going to prepare, in fact, to be a candidate who would have an opportunity, as a matter of fact h
to go texas because the factions of lyndon johnson and the liberal senator were at each other's throats and jack kennedy needed texas again. so they went to texas. they went to houston, they went -- ended up in fort worth, the night before on the 21st of november. and on the 22nd of november, as they were talking in the bedroom, he said something that i found eerie. >> yes. well, the night before they arrived in fort forth, they had come from houston. now they are in the hotel room in the morning. and the president looks at a newspaper. the dallas paper. he's reading it before he flies there. there's a full-page ad welcoming him to texas. they thought they're welcoming me. they were having a good trip so far. the 21st went great. then he read the ad. and it was a 12-list of being a communist, socialist, causing death of american soldiers in vietnam. and he said, will you look at this? we're flying to nut country today. then he said, you know, last night when we got here, would been a hell of a night to assassinate the president. it was dark, the crowds were pressing in. we didn't have e
or lyndon johnson had the power to make these appointments to put him on the foreign relations committee and that may be a good feeling and he was not spending time grinding out legislation, having these hearings, i presume, for almost every ambassador in the united states and all of those at the state department as we celebrated the foreign relations committee a couple of years ago. and they gave me an opportunity to point out this and by the time to process personnel, likewise all the very things that are occurring in the world. and this is not a preoccupation. and how this is because to be a great president and preparing to be a candidate because he had already had an experience prior to the one that he was nominated with and what she was almost the vice presidential nominee and he was, i suppose, instructed by what occurred during that time. and i don't want to tell his story before he talks about it today. but i'm excited about it. but it does offer and suggest a pathway to the presidency. historically only one other senator had gone directly to this. and we now have barack obama an
to theodore roosevelt's father. >> i think what happened because of my experience with lyndon johnson, watching him at a vulnerable stage at his life where he opened up to me in ways he wouldn't have if i hadn't known him. i began to feel empathetic. from then on that privilege of working with johnson made me want to choose subjects that i would basically like and respect so i could feel empathetic. i loved living with teddy roosevelt. the most fascinating character. taft, i began to feel more empathetic towards him. it's a way to make them come alive through the stories of their lives. i'm with them day after day for seven years in this case. >> there is life. not to compare the book, but i'll do it any way. there is this aspect of these characters coming to life in a fully formed way. how crushed taft is by the stroke that afflicts his wife. this is amazing. the role of women and here we are in the middle of the 19th century is his best political adviser and pushing him to become president. we're feeling for them in way has feel so contemporary. >> that's what you would hope. if his
are focusing on the lyndon johnson war on poverty. it was 50 years ago this month since the new president focused on those domestic agenda issues in his state of the union address. what has changed, 50 years later? "newsmakers," following "washington journal," 10:00 on the east coast, our guest this week is the ceo of heritage action for america. one of the questions is -- do the states help the gop? [video clip] 72% -- >> 72% of the american people do not like the republican party. i am one of those right now. when most americans look at washington, d.c., they see a game with pretend food fights making sure that well-connected people who can hire a lot of lobbyists have the tax codes and spending in their favor. that if you are a small business person, entrepreneur, or someone who just wants to go to work, you do not have a voice in washington. >> but you are part of the game. you score the members. you are very much a part of the process, at least a lot of republicans say, stirring up things within the party that are not constructive. >> we ask the tough questions and we inform their co
, but she got used to that because lyndon johnson was such a workaholic. as first lady mrs. johnson spent a lot of time at the ranch. it was very important because it provided such a respite from all of the turmoil of washington, particularly later in the presidency where the johnsons could come home tom our recharge their batteries and make that connection back to the land and the place they valued so much. this is mrs. johnson's private bedroom. it was part of the 1967 remodeling. she specified to designers she wanted this to be her forever room. to specify certain elements she wanted -- a fireplace, east facing windows, and a large bi d ookcase to display mementos -- the birds, the china. and also cameras. lyndon johnson gave mrs. johnson at the camera for her wedding gift, and she became a photojournalist. capture home to movies. hours and hours of her home movies. as well as the recorder here where mrs. johnson every night at the white house would record her daily observations. and this became the basis of the "ook, "a white house diary, which is a chronicling of the tumultuous years
. shortly after lyndon johnson became president, the ranch was called the texas white house and life at the ranch revolved around the home. the johnson's return home 74 times during his five years as president. mrs. johnson as first lady love to show off the texas hill country and her home. guests would often informally gather in the den and various heads of state came to visit. mexico, thet of west german chancellor and the israeli chancellor to name a few. they would visit with the johnsons right here in the den. the dining room was a special place for lady bird johnson, where she entertained, she picked out the wallpaper depicting a country seen very similar to the hill country. very similar to what she would have seen out of her picture window that she had installed at her request. this is johnson gave a tour of the house in 1968 that was filmed, where she featured the china uc purchased here in mexico. the president would sit down at this end of the table, where we have the cowhide chair. typical mrs. johnson at the other end of the table. one feature that you will notice next t
. one of the things about lyndon johnson that i always respected is that he was always in a hurry to accomplish things that work for the good of the people. many programs were not working. when they were not working, he was not afraid to change them or even abandon them. party tomistake of the say that if we just cut a program that was not working, that would be the ruination of everything. as a result, the public opinion turned against those kinds of government programs, ronald reagan was elected, the publicans were in office for 12 years, and it changed values. of time,in that period some poverty did increase because some people fell through the cracks, and there were no safety nets for a lot of people in this country. so i think we as a country do adjusts to the needs of the time, and we adjusted to public opinion at the time. which really makes us unique in that respect. host: one of many photographs from the lbj library, president johnson in a ceremony from the rose garden to the white house, and if we look at that, at somebody who spent four years in the johnson white house,
, lyndon baines johnson evoking the memory of jfk. >> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm del walters. here are the top stories. the supreme court putting a stop to same sex marriages in utah, giving the time for appeal of the rulings. >>> 2014 is an election year and shaping the elections there, an extension of jobless benefits and confirmation of janet yellen to head the federal reserve. >>> tribal allies have retain ramala, the iraqi military is set to regain control of fallujah from fighters connected to al qaeda. >>> wednesday is the 50th anniversary of the landmark speech of lyndon johnson declaring a war on poverty. >> and this administration today, here and now, declares ununconditional war on poverty n america. >> the speech came less than two months after the assassination of president kennedy. >> our aim is not only to relieve the symptom of poverty but to cure it. and above all: to prevent it. [applause] >> reporter: poverty had been a major concern of president kennedy and with a country still grieving, and almost one in five americans living in poverty, johnson declar
have to get more rest between flights. it's 50 years since president lyndon johnson called for a war on poverty. we look at the successes and failures of that fight. >> in iraq the government in anbar says it has retaken the city of ramadi, a day after it was seized by militants linked to al qaeda. they remain on the edges of ramadi and fallujah, as local tribal leaders consider their next move. both cities are key regional centres and witnessed fighting. we have more from al jazeera's imran khan. >> after a standoff lasting days the iraqi army is ready to go to the city of fallujah, and fight the al qaeda-linked group i.s.i.l. the agreement to do so was heartfought. sunni tribes insisted they be part of the situation. others disagreed saying i.s.i.l. fighters were protecting fallujah. the standoff is an indication of the sunni tribe and shia-led government disagreements. nouri al-maliki now has an agreement to act. >> translation: there's increased coordination between the army and tribesman. the army provides the tribes with weapons and everything they need in the battle against th
. president lyndon johnson on two locations approached ap executives have me removed from the war arianna and there were lots of other influences on publishers, particularly on television, important donors of the networks. in this environment, the written and photographic product emerged from vietnam. there was a matter of controversy from the beginning. malcolm brown's photograph of the buddhist monk, the first month committing suicide by fire in saigon in 1963. that was a picture that helped shape president kennedy's view is that the government, that supported, wasn't doing an adequate job. in fact ambassador henry cabot lodge later told me that he had gone to the 0 office to get his last instructions before being appointed ambassador to vietnam, washington post was open, the kennedys's best, there is a picture of the burning mount on the front page and kennedy says you better go over and change things. we can't let this happen again. interestingly enough the new york times, the story did not published a photograph. new york times did not published a photograph of the burning monk meani
bunton johnson. this was lyndon johnson's grandmother. i didn't know about her, although she was in the books, but i have not dwelt on a part of the tarot books about lyndon johnson. but lucy johnson was giving me my children a 200 of the johnson ranch which is a national park and a preservation area. she was giving us a tour of the house that they had grown up in and were part of that range. she talked about her great-grandmother, who had been out there in johnson county in johnson city in that area. and how she had survived an indian raid in their home by hiding under the house and putting a rug over the trapdoor that she had gone under and putting a diaper in her baby's mouth so that the baby wouldn't cry, and she heard the indians, in. she stayed down there, and she took the horses outside and then she heard footsteps back in and her husband was crying or it just out loud, thinking that she had been taken or killed. so she opened the trap door and came out. this is what was passed down. and i said, oh, my gosh, she should be in the book. and i went back and did verify all
after president lyndon johnson first announce the initiative. your phone calls, e-mails and tweets. >> president obama urged congress to extend unemployment coverage for those without jobs. >> hi, everybody, and happy new year. this is a time when we look ahead to all the possibilities and opportunities of the year to come -- when we resolve to better ourselves, and to better our relationships with one another. and today, i want to talk about one place that washington should start -- a place where we can make a real and powerful difference in the lives of many of our fellow americans right now. just a few days after christmas, more than one million of our fellow americans lost a vital economic lifeline -- the temporary insurance that helps folks make ends meet while they look for a job. republicans in congress went home for the holidays and let that lifeline expire. and for many of their constituents who are unemployed through no fault of their own, that decision will leave them with no income at all. we make this promise to one another because it makes a difference to a mother who
can see in this wonderful play about lyndon johnson, there is an interesting moment. after he was out of office and was fading away from public life we had a terrible episode in mississippi when the civil rights workers were killed. lyndon johnson had trouble motivating jay edgar hoover to go down and investigate it because hoover didn't like doing that. johnson had to do something to convince jay edgar hoover you need to go down there and launch an operation to track down these murders to get how did he do that? he knew that jay edgar hoover hated him and feared him even though he at this point was out of office so he called him and he said i want you to go down to mississippi as my personal envoy to investigate what happened to those workers and write me a report about the tension in mississippi. and if alan dulles said i don't even know the name of the governor of mississippi. he had never been involved in the civil rights issue at all. he did go to mississippi and spent two days and wrote a little report that no one ever read, but the reason he was sent there was because lyndon jo
measures from officers and new methods of bureaucratic oversight. decade later president lyndon johnson was still smarting from criticism he had received from republican challenger barry goldwater that johnson had led district descending to a chaos of crime. despite his triumphant election returns the president was keen to appoint a special committee on crime in the district of columbia in july 1965. the task force and a good part of its time assessing the work of the d.c. metropolitan police department and concluded its analysis with the stock admonition, no one in the district of columbia should underestimate the goal of experience and misunderstanding which separates police from poor citizens. to form the base of its belief recommendations the commission recruited the international association of chiefs of police to recommend structural changes to the npd and a professional association was by now well accustomed to its role as expert consulted to speed the transition to a more professional police culture. the organizational trend that most jumped out when it looked at d.c.'s police w
lyndon johnson called for a war on poverty. we look at the successes and failures of that fight.
that i have had access to over the years and one is a dramatic picture of lyndon johnson who was one of the presidency list in the book as being stuck in the bubble particularly at the end of the presidency and he was almost literally a president of the white house because of the decisions made notably the vietnam war. we think about how difficult the politics are but remember they chanted how many kids did you kill today that has to be tough for the high minded politician to deal with and he had to deal with that day after day and for a while at the end he couldn't speak except in the military bases where there was deference shown to the commander in chief or a conservative campus is because everywhere else there would be sometimes violent demonstrations against the vietnam war. nixon felt the same way. he had the same problem as he escalated the war. the treated more and more in his inner circle and didn't really break out of it and feels the need to at the end of the scandal of how isolated nixon was in the paranoid atmosphere around him he was already talking to a couple of staff
. >> she agreed to go to texas because lyndon johnson and ralph yarborough for senator were at each other's throats. so they went to texas and they went to houston. they ended up in fort worth the night before on the 21st of november. on the 22nd as they were talking in the bedroom he said something that i found buried. >> yes terry the night before they arrived in fort worth and they had come from houston close to midnight, now they are in a hotel room in the morning. the president looks at the newspaper, the dallas paper. there is a full-page ad welcoming him to texas. he looked at it any thought they are welcoming me. this is great because they were having a good trip in texas. hundreds of thousands of people and motorcades in several cities. it was a 12-point list of attacks against him for causing the death of american soldiers in vietnam. jfk said jackie will you look at this? we are flying into country today. then he said you know, last night when we got here it would have been a hell of an eye to assassinate a president. the crowds were pressing in on us and they didn't have enoug
poverty this america, all occurred when lyndon johnson was president, but all were justified in large measure as memorials to kennedy, the martyred president. had kennedy lived, it is conceivable much of his legacy would never have occurred. certainly no civil rights legislation would have been approved in 1964. perhaps it might have come later, but it is an open question which direction the civil rights movement might have gone had that legislation within been further delayed and delayed. for activists were already moving away from nonviolence. even martin luther king in his speech at the lincoln memorial during the famed march on washington in an oft-overlooked passage warned that america would be in for, quote, a rude awakening if there were no strong actions taken soon to redress the grievances of african-americans. it was the tragedy of kennedy's assassination that was the rude awakening that finally prompted congress to act. now, kennedy had been president for two years and ten months when he was assassinated. reagan had been president bare hi ten weeks when he was shot. but he
examples of liberalism, lyndon johnson after 1964 had huge majority in congress and had his way, republicans won five of the next six and seven of the next nine presidential elections. let him have his way in new york city. and let people see what happens. there are more 30 contracts of public employees unions have been held in advance until mayor bloomberg got out of there because they assume ed de blasio and supine counsel will go along with anything they asked for. i give them lee years and people will be begging for a return to something. >> it is interesting, too, while he talks about going after the high earners to help pay for added benefits for -- the -- school children who has no talk about talking about the teachers you don't know son the universal pre-since there is very little social signs that suggests it does much for the children involved, the real reason for it is it does a great deal for the teachers unions because you have to hire teachers that are unionized and pay dues to the unions that pass them on in campaign contributions to people like the new mayor. >>
it. [ applause ] >> welcome back to "hardball." that was president lyndon johnson launching a war on poverty. according to "the new york times," many economists believe that official number grossly understates the impact and effectiveness of anti-poverty programs like food stamps, social security, and unemployment insurance. the times said, quote, a fuller accounting suggests that poverty rate, the poverty rate has dropped to 16% today from 26% in the late 1960s. nonetheless, conservatives have branded the war on poverty as a failure. here is a video of senator marco rubio, one that he released on this, the 50th anniversary week. >> 50 years ago, president lyndon johnson declared a big government war on poverty. well, since then american taxpayers have spent about $20 trillion on welfare and other government programs that claim to lift people out of poverty. and yet today tens of millions of americans live beneath the poverty line. in other words, for millions of americans living in poverty, the american dream doesn't seem reachable. and that's unacceptable. after 50 years, isn't
of the country to show you how -- my predecessor, one of my predecessor, lyndon johnson, he had overcome one or two filibusters, r. me, 430 filibusters, things have gotten out of whack that's why we change dollars the rules, now we say, madge court not such a bad word, majority will determine who can be on president obama's team. the founding fathers, this fill buster that they so loved is not part of the constitution. it's not a privilege it's a right. and, bob, just also i want to just say this, the founding fathers they decided what should be super majority, impeachments and stuff like that. one was improving nominations. approving nominations. >> schieffer: let me ask you this, listen to you this morning if republicans continue to throw up the opposition you've been receiving, you say you've been receiving, do you have plans to extend this ban on filibusters? right now you've worked out this rule which they vehemently oppose so that it's very difficult to filibuster nominations, would you be willing to just go to a senate where just majority rules and that's it? >> bob, i think it's som
that is unfortunate. >> would it be fair to call lyndon johnson the more recent imperial president in american history, given the basically complete involvement in vietnam, almost all just under his guidance and so forth? >> lyndon johnson was in many respects an imperial president could i think that with johnson we begin to see the cusp of the presidencyimperial in that sense. there have been some who have acted imperiously since then -- the bushes, no doubt about that. but he was the last person to understand the use and abuse of power. unfortunately, he abused it in many respects, as did any of the presidents who succeeded him. but he was last person who understood that because of his consummate command of the levers of power within the united states, he understood much better how to maneuver power overseas. he was less interested in what went on oversees and his presidency was defined by his adventures in vietnam, which were almost left to him in many respects. he inherited them. he certainly did not make them any better, no doubt about that. but he did understand the use of power, especially with
'd say lyndon johnson. if you ask a conservative -- i'm sorry, in 1964, he would say lyndon johnson and a conservative would say goldwater, so that's one distinction. >> are you a neo-conservative? >> well, i tell you, i was born in 1977, so the people he's talking about had mostly made their move by then. so i think the term just means a little less than it used to. it's also come to be understood as a term about foreign policy, which it didn't used to be. i think it wasn't for irving kristol and for many people in that generation. that happened through the 1980s and became a much more prominent term really in the last decade. but i do actually identify with a lot of the early neo- conservatives, because what they did, not -- beyond moving from left to right and maybe the reason they moved from left to right is that they tried to apply -- they tried to apply social science to politics in a way that led them to conservatism. they tried to be empirical. they tried to be concrete. they tried to be constructive and so they were a little less theoretical and a little more engaged with p
speech by lyndon baines johnson. ,lbj. we look at the speech and it'sing. >> this administration today here and now declares unconditional war on poverty in america. >> reporter: the speech came less than two months after the assassination of president kennedy. >> our aim is not only to relief the symptom of poverty, but to cure it, and above all to prevent it. >> reporter: poverty had been a major concern of president kennedy and with the country still grieving and one in five americans living in poverty johnson declared war on poverty. university of texas dallas professor wrote a book about how poverty undermined the united states. he said that johnson's war on poverty was one of his best. >> he knew he was not going to be a loved president. therefore it's much easier to continue the line of a presidency that was more than admired. he was loved and whatever, and take his agenda and make it yours. all the time making sure you give enough credit to the person. >> let us carry forward the plans and programs of john fitzgerald kennedy, not because of our sorrow or sympathy, but because t
years. while. two years. of crse 50 years ago lyndon johnson claimed his war on poverty would end poverty in america. the u.n. will do better. ted turner gave him a billion dollars for this. individual governments and squandered nearly a trillion dollars of foreign aid trying to lift people out of poverty in africa. i say squandered because aer they spent trillions for income per capita it went down. that is maybe because the foreign aid encourages dependency and afrian kleptocrats government steal much of the money. what is thelternative? michael fay says he has an answ. what is yours? >> we are going straight to the port. cash transfers from you directly to them. no middleman, no leakage, no hidd costs. john: the charity, and you have raised about $6 million. just given 27,000 people-the thousand dollars each. >> that is exactly right. a thousd for the households. john: this sounds like a stupid idea. they will just spend it and then it won't have any. >> you are not the only one. the truth is thererer has been about a decade of research that shows the exact opposite. what are t
is an interest- an interesting point, because most presidents get the big things done in their first term. lyndon johnson, after the huge landslide made it very clear that he had one year. he knew capital hill better than anyone, and he had one year to great society, however defined, enacted into law. and turned out to be right. already midterm elections, and the effect of the vietnam war to be managed on the hill. presidents historically have used their first terms to do their biggest oracle achievements. i would suspect that the president's defenders would point out that the very last thatse that he kept is one presidents for a hundred years have been trying to keep to escalate. universal health care -- successfully, universal health care. host: one of the news remembered resident obama accepting lame for the health-care failure. i want to play a little but of that clip, and have you put it in perspective. >> i understand why folks are frustrated, i would be too, atause sometimes people look what is taking place in notington, and they say enough is getting done that helps me with my life. and r
of president lyndon johnson's war on poverty speech. now in the coming days al jazeera's correspondents across the country will examine its successes, failures and how its legacy still shapes lives today. the speech that set it in motion. >> this administration, today, here and now, declares un, war unconditional war on poverty in america. >> the speech came less than two months after the assassination of president kennedy. >> our aim is not only to relieve the symptom of poverty but to cure it. and above all: to prevent it. [applause] >> reporter: poverty had been a major concern of president kennedy and with the country still grieving and almost one in five americans living in poverty, johnson declared war on poverty. university of texas at dallas professor mehai nadin wrote a book on how poverty could undermine the viability of the united states. he says johnson's speech was nearly perfect. >> johnson realized he was not going to be a loved president. therefore it is much easier to continue the line of a president that was more than admired, he was loved and whatever, and take his agenda
will focus on lyndon johnson's call to action and getting heated in hawaii over solar power and why there are
. >> paul ryan and marco rubio are using the 50th anniversary of lyndon johnson's war on poverty to push their party to reach out to the poor. though rubio posted a video on youtube declaring government spending alone is not the answer. >> after 50 years, isn't it time to declare big government's war on poverty a failure? >> all of this will be front and center at the president's state of the union address on january 28th, and top aides tell us he'll also be doing campaign stops around the country promoting the theme between now and then. >> ed, president obama is back, but the first lady stayed behind in hawaii. >> that's right, the white house tells us the first lady wanted to celebrate her 50th birthday with friends in hawaii. they initially told us this was the president's birthday gift to her, part of that gift. we learned today that means he's paying for the rental there in hawaii, but the air force jet, of course, will be picked up by taxpayers. the president's advisers said if he could pay out of his pocket for a first class ticket, he would do that, but being first lady requires
after declaring a war on poverty we will focus on lyndon johnson's call to action and getting heated in hawaii over solar power and why there are serious roadblocks planning to go green in the aloha state. ♪ you can call it the big chill part two on the heels of a major cold front that socked large parts of the nation last week, another one has arrived and it may be worse, packing some of the coldest temperatures this country has felt in more than 20 years. good morning and welcome to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie sy. a widespread arctic blast known as the polar vortex will bring freezing winds impacting 140 million people across 45 states and exposure to this dangerous weather could result in life-threatening frost bite and hypothermia and some people could be 40 degrees below normaler and the plains and upper midwest are bracing for cold that could dip down to minus 60 degrees and bringing chicago to a stand still and the city is expecting temperatures of minus 20 degrees but the wind chill will feel like minus 50 a temperatures in the windy city is colder than the south pole
, bill clinton and lind don johnson and they engaged congress. lyndon johnson was famous for twisting arms and bending ears and bill clinton would be on the phone in the middle of the night talking and trying to persuade them. >> this president never does that. he doesn't even socialize with the people. in washington, all of that counts? >> i think that is true. it is different than a corporate environment. he didn't run to be a ceo, he ran to be president. all presidents have had congresses. >> no debate. >> and so much worse that i do not buy that in what it is now. they have to deal with it. it is part of the situation, he hasn't put his mind to do that and dealt with the realities of that. >> jeff, i am out of time. 20 seconds. go a head and respond. >> this president came in office saying he wanted to do it differently and many cases was shown a level of disrespect. but in the end of the day we are seeing a different republican party that is not willing to deal make as the ones in clentones. >> and not good to see a president who is good at. it >> thank you very much. >> and in t
. lyndon johnson's love letters to lady bird was recently published. but there is nothing like a abigail and john exchange. >> maybe there is a bias? [laughter] >> i think when it was during a time when there were so many players on many stages, that is the thing that sets them apart. >> here is a question about peacefield. "many president used their homes as a neutral space for meetings. did john and abigail host any dignitaries at peacefield?" >> cadets from west point came. they had a band. they served from march-march. they had officers. john adams gave a talk to the troops. occasionally people would come by. they did not interchange in the sense of politically entertaining. it was family for the most part. >> mount vernon and the washington seem to be constantly welcoming people into their house. >> there was a lot of traffic. people wanted to be close to the president. i think social standards were different than now. if someone came to your door, they would not turn you away. >> did she continue to write letters at the time they were separated? >> she did. another important point
it be fair to call lyndon johnson the more recent imperial president in american history, given the basically complete involvement in vietnam, almost all just under his guidance and so forth? >> lyndon johnson was in many respects an imperial president. i think that with johnson we begin to see the cusp of the end of the imperial presidency in that sense. there have been some who have acted imperiously since then -- the bushes, no doubt about that. but he was the last person to understand the use and abuse of power. unfortunately, he abused it in many respects, as did any of the presidents who succeeded him. but he was last person who understood that because of his consummate command of the levers of power within the united states, he understood much better how to maneuver power overseas. he was less interested in what went on oversees and his presidency was defined by his adventures in vietnam, which were almost left to him in many respects. he inherited them. he certainly did not make them any better, no doubt about that. but he did understand the use of power, especially within the united
. .. >> lyndon johnson was certainly an imperial president. i think what we see in johnson we start to see the cusp of the end of the imperial presidents in the united states. there have been presidents the acted in three fleet since then. the bush, no doubt about that. but he was the last person i think to understand the use and abuse of power. unfortunately, he abused it in many respects. as did many of the presidents who succeeded him. but he wasn't the last person who understood because of his constant demand of power within the united states he understood much better how to maneuver power overseas. he was less interested in what went on overseas and, unfortunately, his presidency was really defined by his adventure in vietnam which were almost less than in many respects. he inherited that. he did not making any better, no doubt about that but he did understand the use of power and especially within the united states. he was i think one of the last presidents who did it truly understand that. >> there was one person here i know where to ask me a question about who i thought was my favo
by party and year. you can see an increase in volatility in the presidential vote with the lyndon johnson landslide and the ronald reagan landslide. after that, you see declining volatility which we attribute to increasing political polarization and partisan sorting. the shellurself at game both and what do you say? what is happening? distribution vote over the election years from 1960 until the present, that there has been a greater dispersion of electoral vote. party'sncides with the counting on certain states to deliver electoral votes for winning the presidency. thisu take the measure of dispersion and correlate it with time, you come up with a correlation of about .44, a moderately strong correlation. when you look at the effects of polarization, they are not good in terms of public approval, executive and legislative performance. dealing time a presidential seems to get over 50% is during the honeymoon. even president obama, his approval rating has fallen to 45% with a 51% disapproval rating. congressional approval rating has fallen to an all-time low. i have tracked the question ab
tells her that he had nothing to do with the enemies list when it was his idea. her lyndon johnson had bugged his campaign plane. knew that was not true. he filled her mind with things that made what she was reading in the newspaper make no sense at all. end, he did not even have the courage to tell her he was going to resign. he had julie the first time he would resign on august 2, he had julie tell his wife and the whole family persuaded him not to resign. when he finally made the decision to resign, he had woods telluld -- her. >> who was that? >> that was his secretary. the one regret she had from that period, this is evidence she was not tellbut -- he did hair -- tell her there was a taping system. he did not involve her in the decision about what to do about the tapes when it became clear that this was going to be come a major issue -- become a major issue when the taping system was about to be revealed to the public. she felt he had made a huge error and he should have destroyed them. by the way, he could have. at that time in the united states, those tapes were private property
years after president lyndon johnson first announced the initiative. former congressman james jones joins us. we will take your phone calls, e-mails and tweets beginning live at 7 a.m. eastern on c- span. >> c-span, we bring public affairs events from washington directly to you, putting you in the room at congressional hearings, white house events, briefings and conferences and offering complete gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house, all as a public service of private industry. we are c-span, created by the cable tv industry 34 years ago and funded by your local cable or satellite provider. now, you can watch us in hd. >> next, congresswoman jackie spear and former congresswoman jane harman taking part in a discussion focused on women and their attempts to pursue second careers. this is from politicos women rule series. it is about 30 minutes. >> good morning, i am rachel olkin. i'm here with an incredibly diverse group of women who have reinvented themselves and their careers through their tenacity and perseverance. rohini dey he has a masters in economics and a doctorate in m
in the presidential vote with the lyndon johnson landslide and the ronald reagan landslide. after that, you see declining volatility which we attribute to increasing political polarization and partisan sorting. imagine yourself at the shell game booth and what do you see? what is happening? the electoral vote distribution over the election years from 1960 until the present, that there has been a greater dispersion of electoral vote. this coincides with the party's counting on certain states to deliver electoral votes for winning the presidency. if you take the measure of this dispersion and correlate it with time, you come up with a correlation of about .44, a moderately strong correlation. when you look at the effects of polarization, they are not good in terms of public approval, executive and legislative performance. the only time a presidential seems to get over 50% is during the honeymoon. even president obama, his approval rating has fallen to 45% with a 51% disapproval rating. congressional approval rating has fallen to an all-time low. about 85% disapproved. i have tracked the question
there is no question that the war on poverty that lyndon johnson the cleared 50 years ago wednesday has made very important advances. there is just no question. in 1963, 51% of african- americans were in poverty and about 25% had graduated from high school. i think that one of the things -- have heard us talk about and i think you will see jason furman, of our council of economic advisers talk about more, that our government has started looking at a broader measure of poverty. but making sure that we are looking at all the things that people are doing, including the things like the earned income tax credit, food stamps. when you look at that measure, i think you will find that poverty has come down close to 40%, perhaps 35% to 40%. there has been important progress. and it is important to understand that many of the things that have been done over the last 20 years have mattered. into --ple, when i came when i was first here in 1993, there was probably about 1.7 million americans above the poverty line because of the earned income tax credit. now, because of measures that have been done over the
of the president lyndon b. johnson's first state of the union address to congress, in which he dechaired an all-out war on poverty in america. 50 years later the battle continues. officially the poverty rate has fallen just 4% since president johnson's speech from 19% to 15%. right now poverty is close to its highest level since the 1960s. but viewed in a larger context, the war on poverty has been a successful one. as this chart from the new york times indicates, the poverty rate would be nearly twice as high were it not for programs like social security, food stamps and home heating assistance. social security alone cuts poverty by 8.5%. but skyrocketing inequality and republican attempts to tear apart the social safety net have slowed the progress made in the '60s and '70s. since 1979, income for the top 1% has increased over 200%. while the bottom 80% has made only the most modest gains. before going home in december, congress allowed long term uninsurance benefits to expire. senate democrats plan to hold a vote to extend the benefits this evening, but if republicans will not listen to thei
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